DID YOU GET THE MEMO?

You’ve probably seen the buzz around #ReleaseTheMemo on social and other media. But perhaps you found it hard to follow from a privacy advocate’s point of view.

The House Intelligence Committee in Congress agreed to share a document that allegedly described abuses of FISA surveillance, pending the president’s approval. 

Now that it’s finally been released, let’s take a look if it lived up to the hype…

The predictions:

  • It would describe political surveillance, conducted with the knowledge of President Obama, of people involved in the Trump campaign
  • It would show the bias inherent in the Mueller investigation of President Trump
  • It would vastly misrepresent the underlying intelligence reports
  • It would be unprecedented to release to the public reports of such a highly classified nature, potentially compromising national security
  • It would provide substantial evidence for the need of greater oversight of FISA surveillance

The precedents:

The realities:

  • Its main point is that the FBI failed to disclose bias by former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele against Trump as part of its application for a FISA warrant; But it was already well-known that Steele’s firm received payment from Democrats, that he was vehemently opposed to Trump’s election, and that his dossier constituted opposition research
  • It doesn’t lessen any suspicion of collaboration between the Trump campaign and Russian operatives, because that has been shown from other sources than the Steele dossier
  • Perhaps the FBI should have caveated better on the FISA application as to Steele’s motivations.
  • However, the memo doesn’t seem to substantively reveal improper political surveillance by the FBI motivated by political animus against Trump
  • From our standpoint, the memo seems to have been released as a parry in the knife fight of partisan struggles; it doesn’t reveal material relevant to Restore the Fourth’s mission
  • Suggestions of the memo compromising national security seem to be overblown; the memo could easily have been part of a public discussion prior to this, and the fact that it wasn’t suggests that our system vastly overclassifies information, and is reluctant to let the public know about things we’re in fact fully capable of understanding.

BLOCK S.139 IN THE SENATE!

Let your senator know that nothing less than real NSA surveillance reform will do.

Perhaps you’ve been following the continuing debate in Congress on NSA surveillance, and the expiration of Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act that makes the dragnet possible. If so, then you likely heard that Thursday the House voted down Rep. Amash’s amendment, the USA RIGHTS Act, that would have given us real mass surveillance reform. You may also know that they approved a bill, S.139, which extends Section 702 for 6 more years.

Here’s how your representatives voted on:

We still have a chance for meaningful surveillance reform this coming Tuesday when the Senate takes up S. 139. We need 41 senators to come to the aid of the Constitution by voting no on cloture for S. 139. 27 Senators voted yesterday against the Senate considering S. 139 at all, so we only need 14 more.

If S. 139 were to pass, that would not only mean six more years of the NSA spying on American citizens, but also an expansion of ‘about collection’ abilities by law enforcement.

A no vote for cloture on S. 139 will stop it from even being considered, and open the door to considering real reform. We’re urging everyone to contact their senator’s office – but especially if you are a constituent of one of the pivotal senators below.

Find Your Senator